Underground Thrift's "Stuff A Sack" Sale

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Located in the well-heeled neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights, Plymouth Church's Underground Thrift Store is a small, cozy shop with an unusually high concentration of designer finds. Last Sunday and the Sunday prior, the store held its bi-annual Stuff A Sack sale, offering thrifters a chance to fill a bag with merchandise for just $25. On the sale's first Sunday event, Sunita V and I headed over to scope out Underground Thrift for the first time, and were totally impressed by the store's vast array of barely-worn clothing and high-end labels. Although the "sacks" used by Underground are modestly-sized, and accessories like jewelry and belts are excluded, the sale was still an amazing deal due to the sheer amount of designer items I scored. Some highlights included several Michael Kors pieces, a chambray Vince top and even a Marc Jacobs little black dress, new-with-tags and originally priced at $1,600. (!!!) At the end of the sale, I walked away with 17 items for $25, bringing the cost of each item to just around $1.50.

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If you're thinking of visiting Underground Thrift, the Stuff A Sack sale is obviously the best way to get huge savings, but the regular prices on clothing were also very reasonable (most items were under $20).  Also, don't come here expecting super-trendy merchandise--due to the refined neighborhood, the stuff definitely slants toward a more conservative style, though there are still plenty of fun and fashion-forward finds. Best of all, Underground Thrift is pretty discerning when it comes to donations, accepting only clean and like-new items, with a strong emphasis on brand/label.

Some brand new Michael Kors shoes, sadly too big!

Some brand new Michael Kors shoes, sadly too big!

And as you've probably noticed from the photos, the Underground Thrift Store isn't really underground. The name actually refers to Plymouth Church's ties to the abolitionist movement of mid-1800s and its active support of the Underground Railroad. (The church's first minister, Henry Ward Beecher, was a well-known abolitionist, as well as the brother of famed anti-slavery novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe.) Because of the church's history, the shop donates 25% of its net profits to organizations fighting modern-day slavery and human trafficking.

Unfortunately, Underground Thrift is on hiatus for the rest of the summer, but the good news is that the shop will be back up and running by early September. To stay updated on the reopening, or to hear about upcoming Stuff A Sack sales (typically held at the end of each season), make sure to follow Underground Thrift on Facebook